Relationship between mortality and fine particles during Asian dust, smog–Asian dust, and smog days in Korea

@article{Kim2012RelationshipBM,
  title={Relationship between mortality and fine particles during Asian dust, smog–Asian dust, and smog days in Korea},
  author={Hyun-Sun Kim and Dong-sik Kim and Ho Kim and Seungmuk Yi},
  journal={International Journal of Environmental Health Research},
  year={2012},
  volume={22},
  pages={518 - 530}
}
This study examined the association between all-cause/cardiovascular mortality and PM2.5 as related to Asian dust (AD), smog–AD, smog, and nonevent days and evaluated the differential risks according to specific events for mortality. The daily records of all-cause/cardiovascular mortality and PM2.5 from March to May 2003–2006 in Seoul, Korea, were used as independent and dependent variables. Differences in the event effects were assessed using a time-series analysis. Both all-cause and… Expand
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