Relationship between facial asymmetry and judging trustworthiness in faces

@article{Zaidel2003RelationshipBF,
  title={Relationship between facial asymmetry and judging trustworthiness in faces},
  author={Dahlia W. Zaidel and Sunita Bava and Val{\'e}ria Aquilino Reis},
  journal={Laterality},
  year={2003},
  volume={8},
  pages={225 - 232}
}
Nonverbal facial signals provide valuable information for successful social interactions. Previous findings showed left-right facial asymmetry in attractiveness, smiling, and health in faces, and here we investigated the asymmetrical status of trustworthiness. Pairs of left-left and right-right faces from 38 photographs were viewed by participants who judged which member of the pair looked the most trustworthy. The results were compared to attractiveness and smiling judgements (Zaidel, Chen… 

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  • D. Zaidel, J. Cohen
  • Psychology, Medicine
    The International journal of neuroscience
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The findings contribute to the empirical bases for understanding personality judgments from brief speech signals and are discussed in light of previous research, implications, potential applications, limitations and suggestions for further research.
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