Relational Trauma and the Developing Right Brain

@article{Schore2009RelationalTA,
  title={Relational Trauma and the Developing Right Brain},
  author={Allan N. Schore},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2009},
  volume={1159}
}
  • A. Schore
  • Published 1 April 2009
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Psychoanalysis, the science of unconscious processes, has recently undergone a significant transformation. Self psychology, derived from the work of Heinz Kohut, represents perhaps the most important revision of Freud's theory as it has shifted its basic core concepts from an intrapsychic to a relational unconscious and from a cognitive ego to an emotion‐processing self. As a result of a common interest in the essential, rapid, bodily based, affective processes that lie beneath conscious… 
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