Relation of dipicolinic acid to heat resistance of bacterial spores.

@article{Grecz1970RelationOD,
  title={Relation of dipicolinic acid to heat resistance of bacterial spores.},
  author={Nicholas Grecz and Taimin Tang},
  journal={Journal of general microbiology},
  year={1970},
  volume={63 3},
  pages={
          303-10
        }
}
SUMMARY: Spores of five strains of Clostridium botulinum differing widely in their heat resistance contained 7.4 to 13.4% dipicolinic acid. There appeared to be no correlation between DPA content and heat resistance of the various strains. The rate of loss of DPA during heating at 75 and 100° was consistently slower than the rate of loss of spore viability, though, in general, heat-resistant strains lost DPA less quickly than did heat-sensitive strains. At the instant of thermal death, spores… CONTINUE READING

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