Relatedness and investment in children in South Africa

@article{Anderson2005RelatednessAI,
  title={Relatedness and investment in children in South Africa},
  author={Kermyt G Anderson},
  journal={Human Nature},
  year={2005},
  volume={16},
  pages={1-31}
}
  • K. Anderson
  • Published 1 March 2005
  • Psychology, Economics
  • Human Nature
Investment in children is examined using a nationally representative sample of 11,211 black (African) households in South Africa. I randomly selected one child from each household in the sample and calculated the average genetic relatedness of the other household members to the focal child. Using multivariate statistical analysis to control for background variables such as age and sex of child, household size, and socioeconomic status, I examine whether the coefficient of relatedness predicts… 

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