Rejecting Assimilation, Immersion and Chinoiserie: Reconstructing Identity for Children Adopted from China

@article{Falvey2008RejectingAI,
  title={Rejecting Assimilation, Immersion and Chinoiserie: Reconstructing Identity for Children Adopted from China},
  author={L. Falvey},
  journal={Journal of Chinese Overseas},
  year={2008},
  volume={4},
  pages={275 - 286}
}
  • L. Falvey
  • Published 2008
  • Journal of Chinese Overseas
Beginning in England and Europe in the Eighteenth Century craftspersons and artisans were catering to an insatiable desire for all things Asian (Knox 1994). The well-to-do in Britain and Western Europe actively sought out Eastern — specifically Chinese — designs that represented a cultural capital at the time. To fill the demand, these European artists eagerly (but inaccurately) appropriated and reproduced Chinese-infused motifs on any number of artifacts, from architecture to pottery and… Expand

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