Regulation of reproduction by dominant workers in bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) queenright colonies

@article{Bloch1999RegulationOR,
  title={Regulation of reproduction by dominant workers in bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) queenright colonies},
  author={G. Bloch and A. Hefetz},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={1999},
  volume={45},
  pages={125-135}
}
Abstract The mechanisms of regulating worker reproduction in bumblebees were studied by direct behavioral observations and by measuring ovarian development and juvenile hormone (JH) biosynthesis rates in workers under different social conditions. Workers in the last stage of Bombus terrestris colony development (the competition phase) had the lowest ovarian development and JH biosynthesis rates. Callows introduced into colonies immediately after queen removal (dequeened colonies) demonstrated a… Expand

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