Regulation of E-cadherin/Catenin Association by Tyrosine Phosphorylation*

@article{Roura1999RegulationOE,
  title={Regulation of E-cadherin/Catenin Association by Tyrosine Phosphorylation*},
  author={Santiago Roura and Susana Miravet and José A. Piedra and Antonio Garcı́a de Herreros and Mireia Du{\~n}ach},
  journal={The Journal of Biological Chemistry},
  year={1999},
  volume={274},
  pages={36734 - 36740}
}
Alteration of cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion is frequently associated to tyrosine phosphorylation of p120- and β-catenins. We have examined the role of this modification in these proteins in the control of β-catenin/E-cadherin binding usingin vitro assays with recombinant proteins. Recombinant pp60c-src efficiently phosphorylated both catenins in vitro, with stoichiometries of 1.5 and 2.0 mol of phosphate/mol of protein for β-catenin and p120-catenin, respectively. pp60c-src… 

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