Regulation of Body Temperature by Some Mesozoic Marine Reptiles

@article{Bernard2010RegulationOB,
  title={Regulation of Body Temperature by Some Mesozoic Marine Reptiles},
  author={Aur{\'e}lien Bernard and Christophe L{\'e}cuyer and Peggy Vincent and Romain Amiot and Nathalie Bardet and Eric Buffetaut and Gilles Cuny and François Fourel and François Martineau and Jean-Michel Mazin and Abel Prieur},
  journal={Science},
  year={2010},
  volume={328},
  pages={1379 - 1382}
}
Warm-Blooded Reptiles? Existing reptiles are not thought to be endothermic, but what about extinct species? Three large extinct swimming reptiles, the ichthyosaurs, plesiosaurs, and mosasaurs, were active predators in the Mesozoic oceans. Bernard et al. (p. 1379; see the Perspective by Motani) investigated their metabolism by analyzing the oxygen isotopes in their teeth, compared with fish in deposits from a variety of ocean environments. The data imply that the ichthyosaurs and plesiosaurs… 
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