Regulating Cannabis Social Clubs: A comparative analysis of legal and self-regulatory practices in Spain, Belgium and Uruguay.

@article{Decorte2017RegulatingCS,
  title={Regulating Cannabis Social Clubs: A comparative analysis of legal and self-regulatory practices in Spain, Belgium and Uruguay.},
  author={Tom Decorte and Mafalda Pardal and Rosario Queirolo and Mar{\'i}a Fernanda Boidi and Constanza S{\'a}nchez Avil{\'e}s and {\`O}scar Par{\'e}s Franquero},
  journal={The International journal on drug policy},
  year={2017},
  volume={43},
  pages={
          44-56
        }
}
BACKGROUND Cannabis Social Clubs (CSCs) are a model of non-profit production and distribution of cannabis among a closed circuit of adult cannabis users. CSCs are now operating in several countries around the world, albeit under very different legal regimes and in different socio-political contexts. AIM In this paper we describe and compare the legal framework and the self-regulatory practices of Cannabis Social Clubs in three countries (Spain, Belgium, and Uruguay). The objective of our… Expand
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Cannabis Social Clubs (CSCs) are nonprofit associations of adult cannabis users, which collectively organize the supply of cannabis among their members. As CSCs currently also serve members usingExpand
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