Regular and irregular divisions of Lepidoptera spermatocytes as related to the speed of meiotic prophase

Abstract

Lepidoptera males bear two kinds of meiotic divisions. One is regular (eupyrene) and leads to nucleate, fertilizing spermatozoa. The other (apyrene) shows metaphase I chromosomes clumping together into irregular masses which later split forming daughter cells with unbalanced sets of chromosomes which are eventually extruded from the cells; hence, the spermatids develop into anucleate spermatozoa of unknown function. The apyrene divisions are induced by a haemolymph factor which becomes functional towards pupation. Using incorporation of tritiated thymidine at the premeiotic S-phase as a marker for timing, it was found that the prophase of the apyrene spermatocyte is shorter than that of the eupyrene spermatocyte. It is proposed that meiosis-specific proteins cannot be synthesized during the shortened apyrene prophase and that this is correlated with the irregular chromosome behaviour during the subsequent metaphase-telophase of these spermatocytes.

DOI: 10.1007/BF00292742

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Cite this paper

@article{Friedlaender2004RegularAI, title={Regular and irregular divisions of Lepidoptera spermatocytes as related to the speed of meiotic prophase}, author={Michael M. Friedlaender and Elisabeth Hauschteck-Jungen}, journal={Chromosoma}, year={2004}, volume={93}, pages={227-230} }