Regional localization of the lactase‐phlorizin hydrolase gene, LCT, to chromosome 2q21

@article{Harvey1993RegionalLO,
  title={Regional localization of the lactase‐phlorizin hydrolase gene, LCT, to chromosome 2q21},
  author={C. B. Harvey and Margaret F. Fox and Penny A. Jeggo and Ned Mantei and Sue Povey and D. M. Swallow},
  journal={Annals of Human Genetics},
  year={1993},
  volume={57}
}
The gene LCT which codes for the intestinal disaccharidase lactase‐phlorizin hydrolase has previously been mapped, using somatic cell hybrids and linkage analysis, using the CEPH families, to chromosome 2. We describe here the regional localization of LCT to chromosome 2q21 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of somatic cell hybrids and in situ hybridization. LCT is closely linked to D2844, with a lod score of 30.6 at θ= 0.10. 
The lactase phlorizin hydrolase (LCT) gene maps to pig chromosome 15q13.
TLDR
Comparison of the human chromosomes 2 gene map and the gene map of pig chromosome 15 indicates that the part of human chromosome 2 distal to the q13 band is homologous to pig chromosome15.
Regional localization ofDPP4 (aliasCD26 andADCP2) to chromosome 2q24
TLDR
The recent identification of the ADA binding protein as DPPIV is used to propose that the geneADCP2 should be renamedDPP4, the gene that codes for dipeptidyl peptidase IV, by specific PCR amplification of a fragment of the 3′ untranslated region of the gene.
Assignment of the locus for congenital lactase deficiency to 2q21, in the vicinity of but separate from the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase gene.
TLDR
It is indicated that one major mutation in a novel gene causes CLD in the Finnish population and the critical region could be restricted further, to an approximately 350-kb interval, by ancient-haplotype and linkage-disequilibrium analyses.
MOLECULAR GENETICS OF LACTASE PERSISTENCE
TLDR
This thesis is based on the following original articles, which are referred to in the text by their Roman numerals: Assignment of the locus for congenital lactase deficiency to 2q21, in the vicinity of but separate from the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase gene.
Congenital Maltase-Glucoamylase Deficiency Associated With Lactase and Sucrase Deficiencies
TLDR
The lack of evidence for a causal nucleotide change in the maltase-glucoamylase gene in this patient, and the concomitant low levels of lactase and sucrase activity and starch digestion, suggest that the depletion of mucosal Maltase- gluco amylase activityand starch digestion was caused by shared, pleiotropic regulatory factors.
Genetics of lactase persistence and lactose intolerance.
TLDR
A putative causal nucleotide change has been identified and occurs on the background of a very extended haplotype that is frequent in Northern Europeans, where lactase persistence is frequent.
Molecular genetics of adult‐type hypolactasia
TLDR
Genetic testing for adult type hypolactasia has been introduced into clinical practice in Finland and identification of the genetic change has highlighted the role of non‐coding variants in the regulation of common genes and created new tools to study the mechanism of lactase enzyme activation.
Molecular characterization of a male-specific glycosyl hydrolase, Lma-p72, secreted on to the abdominal surface of the Madeira cockroach Leucophaea maderae (Blaberidae, Oxyhaloinae).
TLDR
Data from the first in vivo inhibition tests indicate that a glycosidase could be directly involved in the production process of some pheromonal compounds in L. maderae males.
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TLDR
It is concluded that humans with high or low levels of lactase can code for identical LPH enzymes.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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