Regional Forest Fragmentation and the Nesting Success of Migratory Birds

@article{Robinson1995RegionalFF,
  title={Regional Forest Fragmentation and the Nesting Success of Migratory Birds},
  author={Scott K. Robinson and Frank R. Thompson and Therese M Donovan and Donald R. Whitehead and John R. Faaborg},
  journal={Science},
  year={1995},
  volume={267},
  pages={1987 - 1990}
}
Forest fragmentation, the disruption in the continuity of forest habitat, is hypothesized to be a major cause of population decline for some species of forest birds because fragmentation reduces nesting (reproductive) success. Nest predation and parasitism by cowbirds increased with forest fragmentation in nine midwestern (United States) landscapes that varied from 6 to 95 percent forest cover within a 10-kilometer radius of the study areas. Observed reproductive rates were low enough for some… Expand

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