Regarding “Eagle-Eyed Visual Acuity: An Experimental Investigation of Enhanced Perception in Autism”

@article{Bach2009RegardingV,
  title={Regarding “Eagle-Eyed Visual Acuity: An Experimental Investigation of Enhanced Perception in Autism”},
  author={Michael Bach and Steven C. Dakin},
  journal={Biological Psychiatry},
  year={2009},
  volume={66},
  pages={e19-e20}
}
o the Editor: ow-level perceptual abnormalities are increasingly seen to play an important role in some features of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) (review [1]) by contributing to impairments f social communication through limiting higher-level visual rocessing of faces, for example. Arguably the most interesting indings are that individuals with ASD can sometimes perform etter than matched control subjects when the task involves ttention to detail (e.g., in visual search [2], finding hidden… Expand

Paper Mentions

Visual Acuity in Adults with Asperger’s Syndrome: No Evidence for “Eagle-Eyed” Vision
BACKGROUND Autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are defined by criteria comprising impairments in social interaction and communication. Altered visual perception is one possible and often discussed causeExpand
Normal Visual Acuity and Electrophysiological Contrast Gain in Adults with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder
TLDR
This study investigated the electrophysiology of very early visual processing by analyzing the pattern electroretinogram-based contrast gain, the background noise amplitude, and the psychophysical visual acuities of participants with high-functioning ASD and controls with equal education, and found no evidence for abnormalities in retinal visual processing in ASD patients. Expand
Far visual acuity is unremarkable in autism: Do we need to focus on crowding?
TLDR
Assessment of far visual acuity in autism using Landolt‐C optotypes defined by different local stimulus attributes suggests altered local lateral connectivity within early perceptual areas underlying spatial information processing in autism is atypical. Expand
Visual search and task-irrelevant shape information in autism spectrum disorder
TLDR
A more complete characterization of the disorder in terms of its symptomatology with regard to visual attention and visual perception might lead to a better understanding of its causes. Expand
Psychophysical measures of visual acuity in autism spectrum conditions
TLDR
Best corrected VA was significantly better than the initial habitual acuity in both groups, but adults with and without ASC did not differ on ETDRS or FrACT binocular VA. Expand
A Close Eye on the Eagle-Eyed Visual Acuity Hypothesis of Autism
Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have been associated with sensory hypersensitivity. A recent study reported visual acuity (VA) in ASD in the region reported for birds of prey. The validity of theExpand
An early origin for detailed perception in Autism Spectrum Disorder: biased sensitivity for high-spatial frequency information.
TLDR
Findings support that locally-biased perception in Autism Spectrum Disorder originates, at least in part, from differences in response properties of early spatial mechanisms favouring detailed spatial information processing. Expand
Contrast sensitivity thresholds in children with autistic spectrum disorder
Aims: To compare a basic visual ability, contrast sensitivity, in participants with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and neuro-typical controls. There has been recent interest in visual perception inExpand
Electrophysiological measures of low-level vision reveal spatial processing deficits and hemispheric asymmetry in autism spectrum disorder.
TLDR
This particular pattern of loss, combined with the observed exaggeration of the loss over the right hemisphere, suggests that a highly specific neural substrate early in the visual pathway is compromised in ASD. Expand
Brief Report: Vision in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: What Should Clinicians Expect?
TLDR
Clinicians should not anticipate reduced VA when assessing children with autism spectrum disorder and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in a sub-group of children with ASD is described. Expand
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References

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TLDR
The results of this study suggest that inclusion of sensory hypersensitivity in the diagnostic criteria for ASC may be warranted and that basic standardized tests of sensory thresholds may inform causal theories of ASC. Expand
Vagaries of Visual Perception in Autism
TLDR
It is suggested that abnormalities in the superior temporal sulcus (STS) may provide a neural basis for the range of motion-processing deficits observed in ASD, including biological motion perception. Expand
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Even the shape of small Landolt-Cs with oblique gaps is adequate and visual acuities from 5/80 (0.06) up to 5/1.4 (3.6) can be tested at a distance of 5 m, and anti-aliasing was improved by a factor of four. Expand
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The Freiburg Visual Acuity Test-Variability unchanged by post-hoc re-analysis
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The similarity between the results of the Best-PEST vs. post-hoc analysis, fitting both slope and threshold, suggest that there is no disadvantage to the constant slope assumed by Best PEST. Expand
Adults with Autism Show Increased Sensitivity to Outcomes at Low Error Rates During Decision-Making
TLDR
Although AD subjects showed occurrences of stereotyped responding, their decision-making behavior was strongly affected by changes in task demands, especially when they experienced frequent success, suggesting behavioral paradigms that provide frequent reinforcement may be helpful in modifying decision- making abilities in AD. Expand
Anti-aliasing and dithering in the 'Freiburg Visual Acuity Test'.
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Rapid acquisition of a semi-objective and reliable acuity estimate makes the 'Freiburg Visual Acuity Test' useful for subject screening in vision research, as well as for routine assessments in the ophthalmic practice. Expand
Enhanced discrimination of novel, highly similar stimuli by adults with autism during a perceptual learning task.
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High-functioning adults with autism and control adults were tested on a perceptual learning task that compared discrimination performance on familiar and novel stimuli, which suggested that features held in common between stimuli are processed poorly and features unique to a stimulus are processed well in autism. Expand
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A new, maximally efficient technique for measuring psychophysical thresholds (Pentland, 1980) has been implemented on the microcomputer and is the most efficient sequential parameter estimation technique possible. Expand
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