Refusing to imagine? On the possibility of psychogenic aphantasia. A commentary on Zeman et al. (2015)

@article{Vito2016RefusingTI,
  title={Refusing to imagine? On the possibility of psychogenic aphantasia. A commentary on Zeman et al. (2015)},
  author={Stefania de Vito and Paolo Bartolomeo},
  journal={Cortex},
  year={2016},
  volume={74},
  pages={334-335}
}
Our ability of “seeing” mental images in the absence of appropriate sensory input has always raised great interest not only in science, but also in philosophy (Sartre, 1940), art and literature (de Vito, 2012). Remarkably, however, some people claim not to experience visual mental images at all. Although the existence of these cases has been known to science for well over 100 years (Galton, 1880, 1883), the phenomenon has been oddly ignored and a systematic research is still lacking. Zeman… Expand
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