Refugia, differentiation and postglacial migration in arctic‐alpine Eurasia, exemplified by the mountain avens (Dryas octopetala L.)

@article{Skrede2006RefugiaDA,
  title={Refugia, differentiation and postglacial migration in arctic‐alpine Eurasia, exemplified by the mountain avens (Dryas octopetala L.)},
  author={Inger Skrede and Pernille B. Eidesen and Rosal{\'i}a Pi{\~n}eiro Portela and Christian Brochmann},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2006},
  volume={15}
}
Many arctic‐alpine organisms have vast present‐day ranges across Eurasia, but their history of refugial isolation, differentiation and postglacial expansion is poorly understood. The mountain avens, Dryas octopetala sensu lato, is a long‐lived, wind‐dispersed, diploid shrub forming one of the most important components of Eurasian tundras and heaths in terms of biomass. We address differentiation and migration history of the species with emphasis on the western and northern Eurasian parts of its… Expand
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TLDR
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Range‐wide phylogeography of the European temperate‐montane herbaceous plant Meum athamanticum Jacq.: evidence for periglacial persistence
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