Refuge Theory and Biological Control

@article{Hawkins1993RefugeTA,
  title={Refuge Theory and Biological Control},
  author={Bradford A. Hawkins and M. B. Thomas and Michael E. Hochberg},
  journal={Science},
  year={1993},
  volume={262},
  pages={1429 - 1432}
}
An important question in ecology is the extent to which populations and communities are governed by general rules. Recent developments in population dynamics theory have shown that hosts' refuges from their insect parasitoids predict parasitoid community richness patterns. Here, the refuge theory is extended to biological control, in which parasitoids are imported for the control of insect pests. Theory predicts, and data confirm, that the success of biological control is inversely related to… Expand
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TLDR
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