• Corpus ID: 30931223

Reforming the State from Afar : Structural Reform Litigation at the Human Rights Courts

@inproceedings{aiken2016ReformingTS,
  title={Reforming the State from Afar : Structural Reform Litigation at the Human Rights Courts},
  author={julian. aiken},
  year={2016}
}

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References

The Law’s Majestic Equality? The Distributive Impact of Judicializing Social and Economic Rights

While many find cause for optimism about the use of law and rights for progressive ends, the academic literature has long been skeptical that courts favor the poor. We show that, with the move toward