Reflective mirrors: Perspective-taking in autoscopic phenomena

@article{Brugger2002ReflectiveMP,
  title={Reflective mirrors: Perspective-taking in autoscopic phenomena},
  author={Peter Brugger},
  journal={Cognitive Neuropsychiatry},
  year={2002},
  volume={7},
  pages={179 - 194}
}
  • P. Brugger
  • Published 2002
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Cognitive Neuropsychiatry
Introduction. “Autoscopic phenomena refer to different illusory reduplications of one's own body and self. This article proposes a phenomenological differentiation of autoscopic reduplication into three distinct classes, i.e., autoscopic hallucinations, heautoscopy, and out-of-body experiences (OBEs). Method. Published cases are analysed with special emphasis on the subject's point of view from which the reduplication is observed. Results. In an autoscopic hallucination the observer's… Expand
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  • Psychology, Medicine
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