Reflections on the prize of prizes: Alfred Nobel

@article{Pederson2006ReflectionsOT,
  title={Reflections on the prize of prizes: Alfred Nobel},
  author={Thoru Pederson},
  journal={The FASEB Journal},
  year={2006},
  volume={20}
}
  • T. Pederson
  • Published 1 November 2006
  • History
  • The FASEB Journal
In 1893, a young man named Ragnar Sohlman was hired as the private assistant to a successful industrialist. Sohlman’s name is not recognized today, but he played a key role in events that led to worldwide acclaim and admiration for his employer—Alfred Bernhard Nobel. Alfred Nobel was born in Stockholm on October 21, 1833. His forebears included a number of scientists and inventors, including Olof Rudbeck, a 17th century engineer of considerable fame within Scandinavia. For some years Alfred’s… 

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The sea urchin's siren.

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