Referential processing in the human brain: An Event-Related Potential (ERP) study

@article{Barkley2015ReferentialPI,
  title={Referential processing in the human brain: An Event-Related Potential (ERP) study},
  author={Christopher M. Barkley and Robert E. Kluender and Marta Kutas},
  journal={Brain Research},
  year={2015},
  volume={1629},
  pages={143-159}
}
A substantial body of ERP research investigating the processing of syntactic long-distance dependencies has shown that, across languages and construction types, the second element in such configurations typically elicits phasic left anterior negativity (LAN). We hypothesized that these effects are not specific to syntactic dependencies, but rather index a more general cognitive operation in which the second (dependent) element in sentence-level linguistic long-distance relationships triggers a… Expand
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