Reexamining Human Origins in Light of Ardipithecus ramidus

@article{Lovejoy2009ReexaminingHO,
  title={Reexamining Human Origins in Light of Ardipithecus ramidus},
  author={C. Owen Lovejoy},
  journal={Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={326},
  pages={74 - 74e8}
}
Referential models based on extant African apes have dominated reconstructions of early human evolution since Darwin’s time. These models visualize fundamental human behaviors as intensifications of behaviors observed in living chimpanzees and/or gorillas (for instance, upright feeding, male dominance displays, tool use, culture, hunting, and warfare). Ardipithecus essentially falsifies such models, because extant apes are highly derived relative to our last common ancestors. Moreover, uniquely… 
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