Reduction of biosphere life span as a consequence of geodynamics

@article{Franck2000ReductionOB,
  title={Reduction of biosphere life span as a consequence of geodynamics},
  author={Siegfried Franck and A. Block and Werner Bloh and Christine Bounama and Hans Joachim Schellnhuber and Y. M. Svirezhev},
  journal={Tellus B: Chemical and Physical Meteorology},
  year={2000},
  volume={52},
  pages={107 - 94}
}
The long-term co-evolution of the geosphere’biospere complex from the Proterozoic up to 1.5 billion years into the planet’s future is investigated using a conceptual earth system model including the basic geodynamic processes. The model focusses on the global carbon cycle as mediated by life and driven by increasing solar luminosity and plate tectonics. The main CO2 sink, the weathering of silicates, is calculated as a function of biologic activity, global run-off and continental growth. The… 

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