Reduction of amphotericin resistance in stationary phase cultures of Candida albicans by treatment with enzymes.

@article{Gale1980ReductionOA,
  title={Reduction of amphotericin resistance in stationary phase cultures of Candida albicans by treatment with enzymes.},
  author={Ernest Frederick Gale and Jenna Ingram and David Kerridge and Vicente Notario and F J Wayman},
  journal={Journal of general microbiology},
  year={1980},
  volume={117 2},
  pages={
          383-91
        }
}
The resistance of Candida albicans to amphotericin B methyl ester increases rapidly as cultures enter the stationary phase of growth; organisms harvested after several days in the stationary phase may have a resistance two or three orders of magnitude greater than that of exponentially growing organisms. This resistance is decreased by incubation of the organisms with enzymes which attack components of the cell wall. Of the enzymes tested, (1 leads to 3)-beta-D-glucanases are the most effective… Expand
Phenotypic resistance to amphotericin B in Candida albicans: relationship to glucan metabolism.
TLDR
There is a correlation between glucan metabolism, glucan enzyme activity and resistance to AME, in that any factor leading to increased glucanase action also results in decreased resistance and vice versa, while incorporation of certain glucose analogues into the 'glucan fraction' delays the further increase in resistance. Expand
Phenotypic Resistance to Miconazole and Amphotericin B in Candida albicans
The effect of polyene antibiotics on Candida albicizns is to induce a change in the permeability of the cytoplasmic membrane such that small molecular weight substances retained in the cytoplasmExpand
Nature and development of phenotypic resistance to amphotericin B in Candida albicans.
  • E. F. Gale
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Advances in microbial physiology
  • 1986
Publisher Summary Resistance to amphotericin in Candida albicans begins to increase when cultures pass into the stationary phase of growth and may reach very high values if incubation continues inExpand
Cell Wall Changes in Amphotericin B-Resistant Strains from Candida tropicalis and Relationship with the Immune Responses Elicited by the Host
TLDR
The response elicited by human blood cells was investigated and found that AmB-resistant strains induced a stronger proinflammatory response than susceptible strains, indicating that the effect of alterations of the cell wall on the immune response is conserved in different types of hosts. Expand
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TLDR
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Alteration of Cell Wall Composition Leads to Amphotericin B Resistance in Aspergillus flavus
TLDR
Results suggest that alterations in the cell wall components of mycelia, especially 1,3‐α‐glucan and protein complex in the outermost wall layer, lead to AmB resistance in Aspergillus flavus. Expand
Implication of cell wall constituents in the sensitivity of Kluyveromyces lactis strains to amphotericin B.
TLDR
The present results reveal that both a change in the ionic charges of the cell wall and an alteration in thecell wall structure modified the sensitivity of these yeast strains to AmB. Expand
Effect of sub-inhibitory concentrations of antifungal drugs on adherence of Candida species
The adherence of three Candida species to human buccal epithelial cells (BECs) following treatment of the yeast with sub-inhibitory concentrations of amphotericin B, nystatin, miconazole nitrate,Expand
Relation between cell wall chitin content and susceptibility to amphotericin B in Kluyveromyces, Candida and Schizosaccharomyces species.
TLDR
Results showed that membrane sterol contents did not enable us to explain resistance or susceptibility of these yeasts to amphotericin B, and it was noted that resistant strains were as rich in ergosterol as sensitive strains. Expand
Phenotypic resistance to miconazole and amphotericin B in Candida albicans.
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Phenotypic resistance to both amphotericin B and miconazole develops in stationary phase cultures of Candida albicans and this resistance lies in changes in the cell wall, indicating that the nature of the changes leading to resistance must be different for the two drugs. Expand
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Evidence is presented which suggests that the degree of reduction of SH groups in the cell surface is an important factor in determining AME resistance. Expand
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TLDR
Addition of sterols at the same time as AME increases the time taken for the release of K+ to reach a given rate; of the sterols tested, zymosterol was the most effective in antagonizing AME, while ergosterol was approximately twice as effective as cholesterol on a molar basis. Expand
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Thin sections of purified walls isolated from organisms harvested either during exponential growth or after 144 h starvation were identical in appearance and characterized by the absence of the electrondense layers observed in sections of intact cells and by a reduction in thickness to 100+/-20nm. Expand
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