Reduction in saturated fat intake for cardiovascular disease.

@article{Hooper2015ReductionIS,
  title={Reduction in saturated fat intake for cardiovascular disease.},
  author={Lee Hooper and Nicole Martin and Asmaa Abdelhamid and George Davey Smith},
  journal={The Cochrane database of systematic reviews},
  year={2015},
  volume={6},
  pages={
          CD011737
        }
}
BACKGROUND Reducing saturated fat reduces serum cholesterol, but effects on other intermediate outcomes may be less clear. Additionally it is unclear whether the energy from saturated fats that are lost in the diet are more helpfully replaced by polyunsaturated fats, monounsaturated fats, carbohydrate or protein. This review is part of a series split from and updating an overarching review. OBJECTIVES To assess the effect of reducing saturated fat intake and replacing it with carbohydrate… 
A systematic review of the effect of dietary saturated and polyunsaturated fat on heart disease.
  • P. Clifton, J. Keogh
  • Medicine, Biology
    Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases : NMCD
  • 2017
Reduction in saturated fat intake for cardiovascular disease.
TLDR
The findings of this updated review suggest that reducing saturated fat intake for atacing the energy from saturated fats eliminated from the diet are more helpfully replaced by polyunsaturated fats, monouns saturated fats, carbohydrate or protein.
Reduction in saturated fat intake for cardiovascular disease.
TLDR
Reducing saturated fat intake and replacing it with carbohydrate (CHO), polyunsaturated (PUFA), monounsaturated fat (MUFA) and/or protein on mortality and cardiovascular morbidity, using all available randomised clinical trials is assessed.
The public health rationale for reducing saturated fat intakes: Is a maximum of 10% energy intake a good recommendation?
TLDR
Taking all the evidence together suggests that replacing SFA by unsaturated fat, preferably polyunsaturated fat (PUFA), to an intake below 10% energy will favourably affect the risk of cardiovascular disease.
Public health guidelines should recommend reducing saturated fat consumption as much as possible: YES.
TLDR
There is much evidence from controlled clinical studies demonstrating that SFAs increase LDL cholesterol, a major causal factor in the development of cardiovascular disease, and current dietary recommendations to decrease SFA and replace it with unsaturated fat should continue to the basis for healthy food-based dietary patterns.
The Evidence for Saturated Fat and for Sugar Related to Coronary Heart Disease.
Effects of total fat intake on bodyweight in children.
TLDR
To assess the effects and associations of total fat intake on measures of weight and body fatness in children and young people not aiming to lose weight, 24 studies comprising three parallel-group RCTs and 21 prospective analytical cohort studies were included.
Dietary treatment to lower cholesterol and triglyceride and reduce cardiovascular risk.
  • F. Welty
  • Medicine
    Current opinion in lipidology
  • 2020
TLDR
Based on the evidence, individuals should continue to minimize saturated fats and refined carbohydrates, eliminate trans-fat and increase fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, and fish or other omega-3 fatty acids because of lowering CVD and total mortality.
Polyunsaturated fatty acids for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.
TLDR
Assessment of effects of increasing total PUFA intake on cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, lipids and adiposity in adults found that effects are unclear as evidence is of very low quality.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 703 REFERENCES
Effect of high-carbohydrate or high-cis-monounsaturated fat diets on blood pressure: a meta-analysis of intervention trials.
TLDR
Diets rich in carbohydrate may be associated with slightly higher blood pressure than diets rich in cis-monounsaturated fat, but the magnitude of the difference may not justify making recommendations to alter the carbohydrate and cis-Monouns saturated fat content of the diet to manage blood pressure.
Reduced or modified dietary fat for preventing cardiovascular disease.
TLDR
The findings are suggestive of a small but potentially important reduction in cardiovascular risk on modification of dietary fat, but not reduction of total fat, in longer trials.
One-year effects of increasingly fat-restricted, carbohydrate-enriched diets on lipoprotein levels in free-living subjects.
TLDR
Data indicate that intakes of fat below about 25 en% and carbohydrate intake above approximately 60 en% yield no further LDL-C lowering in HC and CHL male subjects and can be counterproductive to triglyceride, HDL-C, and apo B levels.
Effects of total fat intake on body weight.
TLDR
There is consistent evidence from RCTs in adults of a small weight-reducing effect of eating a smaller proportion of energy from fat; this was seen in almost all included studies and was highly resistant to sensitivity analyses.
Plasma triacylglycerol and HDL cholesterol concentrations confirm self-reported changes in carbohydrate and fat intakes in women in a diet intervention trial.
TLDR
The lipid responses that were observed in this study provide biological evidence that validates the self-reported change in dietary intakes of fat and carbohydrate in response to the intervention efforts and does not suggest increased cardiovascular disease risk.
The role of reducing intakes of saturated fat in the prevention of cardiovascular disease: where does the evidence stand in 2010?
TLDR
The evidence from epidemiologic, clinical, and mechanistic studies is consistent in finding that the risk of CHD is reduced when SFAs are replaced with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), and insufficient evidence exists to judge the effect on CHD risk of replacing SFAs with MUFAs.
Dietary fat intake and prevention of cardiovascular disease: systematic review
Abstract Objective: To assess the effect of reduction or modification of dietary fat intake on total and cardiovascular mortality and cardiovascular morbidity. Design: Systematic review. Data
Olive oil and reduced need for antihypertensive medications.
TLDR
A slight reduction in saturated fat intake, along with the use of extra-virgin olive oil, markedly lowers daily antihypertensive dosage requirement, possibly through enhanced nitric oxide levels stimulated by polyphenols.
The effect of dietary advice on nutrient intakes: evidence from the diet and reinfarction trial (DART)
TLDR
For each of the dietary aims, the advice had a substantial effect on intakes, as examined in a random subsample of 459 men who were taking part in a randomized controlled trial of secondary prevention of myocardial infarction.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...