Reducing Implicit Gender Leadership Bias in Academic Medicine With an Educational Intervention

@article{Girod2016ReducingIG,
  title={Reducing Implicit Gender Leadership Bias in Academic Medicine With an Educational Intervention},
  author={Sabine Girod and Magali A. Fassiotto and Daisy Grewal and Manwai Candy Ku and Natarajan Sriram and Brian A. Nosek and Hannah A. Valantine},
  journal={Academic Medicine},
  year={2016},
  volume={91},
  pages={1143–1150}
}
PURPOSE One challenge academic health centers face is to advance female faculty to leadership positions and retain them there in numbers equal to men, especially given the equal representation of women and men among graduates of medicine and biological sciences over the last 10 years. [...] Key MethodMETHOD The authors used a standardized, 20-minute educational intervention to educate faculty about implicit biases and strategies for overcoming them. Next, they assessed the effect of this intervention.Expand
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