Reduced proceptivity and sex-motivated behaviors in the female rat after repeated copulation in paced and non-paced mating: Effect of changing the male

@article{VenturaAquino2013ReducedPA,
  title={Reduced proceptivity and sex-motivated behaviors in the female rat after repeated copulation in paced and non-paced mating: Effect of changing the male},
  author={Elisa Ventura-Aquino and A. Fern{\'a}ndez-Guasti},
  journal={Physiology & Behavior},
  year={2013},
  volume={120},
  pages={70-76}
}
  • Elisa Ventura-Aquino, A. Fernández-Guasti
  • Published 2013
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Physiology & Behavior
  • The mating inhibition after repeated copulation (sexual satiety) and its re-commencement after changing the sexually active partner (Coolidge effect) are well recognized phenomena in males, but their occurrence in females is little explored. These two phenomena were compared in conditions when the female regulates copulation timing (pacing) and under non-paced mating. Female rats selected in proestrus copulated incessantly for 3 h with two different partners (for 90 min each), both of them… CONTINUE READING
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