Reduced melanoma after regular sunscreen use: randomized trial follow-up.

@article{Green2011ReducedMA,
  title={Reduced melanoma after regular sunscreen use: randomized trial follow-up.},
  author={Ad{\`e}le C. Green and Gail M. Williams and Valerie Logan and Geoffrey M. Strutton},
  journal={Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology},
  year={2011},
  volume={29 3},
  pages={
          257-63
        }
}
PURPOSE Regular sunscreen use prevents cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma long term, but the effect on melanoma is highly controversial. We evaluated whether long-term application of sunscreen decreases risk of cutaneous melanoma. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS In 1992, 1,621 randomly selected residents of Nambour, a township in Queensland, Australia, age 25 to 75 years, were randomly assigned to daily or discretionary sunscreen application to head and arms in combination with 30 mg beta carotene or… Expand
Prevention of melanoma with regular sunscreen use.
TLDR
Patients at high risk for skin cancer because of phenotypic characteristics who live in or visit sunny climates or who have a family history of melanoma should routinely and thoroughly apply sunscreen before going outside, particularly to those who reside in locations with relatively high levels of ambient UVR. Expand
Melanoma Risk in Relation to Use of Sunscreen or Other Sun Protection Methods
TLDR
Optimal use of routine sunscreen or other sun Protection methods were most strongly associated with decreased melanoma risk; results are limited by the small number of subjects who used sunscreen routinely and lack of specificity regarding other sun protection methods. Expand
Regular Sunscreen Use and Risk of Mortality: Long-Term Follow-up of a Skin Cancer Prevention Trial.
TLDR
Regular use of a sun protection factor 16 sunscreen on head, neck, arms, and hands for 4.5years did not increase mortality and the effect of long-term sunscreen use on mortality was assessed. Expand
Sunscreen Use and Subsequent Melanoma Risk: A Population-Based Cohort Study.
TLDR
Use of SPF ≥ 15 rather than SPF < 15 sunscreens reduces melanoma risk, and use of all women age 40 to 75 years could potentially reduce their melanoma incidence by 18%. Expand
Use of sunscreen and risk of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis
TLDR
The current evidence suggests no increased risk of skin cancer related to sunscreen use, but this systematic review and meta-analysis does not confirm the expected protective benefits of sunscreen against skin cancer in the general population. Expand
69th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology
TLDR
During the Hot Topics Symposium, Dr Allan Halpern discussed the recently published trial that provides direct evidence that regular sunscreen use may prevent melanoma, and new agents in development for skin cancers and precancers. Expand
Sunscreen and melanoma prevention: evidence and expectations
  • M. Wehner
  • Medicine
  • The British journal of dermatology
  • 2018
TLDR
This study evaluated the difference between the number of melanomas predicted with current levels of sunscreen use and the number that would be expected under several scenarios of increased sunscreen use over a 20-year period, and presented a theoretical maximum scenario. Expand
Does Sunscreen Use Decrease the Incidence of Primary Cutaneous Melanoma in Caucasians: A Systematic Review
TLDR
This review includes one good quality randomized, controlled trial and one fair quality case-control study investigating the relationship between sunscreen use and melanoma, both of which found a decreased risk of melanoma associated with regular sunscreen use. Expand
Powering a prospective melanoma chemoprevention trial in high‐risk cohorts
TLDR
A review of the literature found several studies that describe the rate of melanoma development in high-risk cohorts, but there is significant disparity in the observed melanoma rate among studies that is likely related to the number of subjects. Expand
Prevention versus early detection for long-term control of melanoma and keratinocyte carcinomas: a cost-effectiveness modelling study
TLDR
Compared with early detection of melanoma, systematic sunscreen use at a population level will prevent substantial numbers of new skin tumours, melanoma deaths and save healthcare costs. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 38 REFERENCES
Prolonged Prevention of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin by Regular Sunscreen Use
TLDR
Regular application of sunscreen has prolonged preventive effects on SCC but with no clear benefit in reducing BCC, according to a 4.5-year randomized controlled trial in an Australian community. Expand
Long-term increase in sunscreen use in an Australian community after a skin cancer prevention trial.
TLDR
Regular voluntary sunscreen use for skin cancer prevention can be sustained by sun-sensitive people in the long term, and Habit formation appears to be an important goal for sun protection programs among those living, or on vacation, in sunny places. Expand
Daily sunscreen application and betacarotene supplementation in prevention of basal-cell and squamous-cell carcinomas of the skin: a randomised controlled trial
TLDR
Cutaneous squamous- cell carcinoma, but not basal-cell carcinoma seems to be amenable to prevention through the routine use of sunscreen by adults for 4.5 years, and there was no beneficial or harmful effect on the rates of either type of skin cancer, as a result of betacarotene supplementation. Expand
Broad-spectrum sunscreen use and the development of new nevi in white children: A randomized controlled trial.
TLDR
The data indicate that broad-spectrum sunscreens may attenuate the number of nevi in white children, especially if they have freckles, as well as a significant interaction was detected between freckling and study group, indicating that sunscreen use was much more important for children with freckle than for children without. Expand
Sunscreen Use and the Risk for Melanoma: A Quantitative Review
TLDR
This meta-analysis of 18 casecontrol studies found no good evidence for an increased risk for melanoma with sunscreen use, and the strength and the consistency of the observed associations between melanoma and sunscreen use were examined. Expand
Application patterns among participants randomized to daily sunscreen use in a skin cancer prevention trial.
TLDR
It is possible to implement the daily application of sunscreen in sun-exposed populations, although protection would be increased if the quantity of sunscreen applied were greater. Expand
The Nambour Skin Cancer and Actinic Eye Disease Prevention Trial: design and baseline characteristics of participants.
TLDR
Whether regular use of high-protection sunscreen and/or dietary supplementation with beta-carotene (30 mg daily) can alter the incidence rates of basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinoma of the skin over a minimum follow-up time of 4.5 years is evaluated. Expand
Counterpoint: Sunscreen Use Is a Safe and Effective Approach to Skin Cancer Prevention
  • M. Berwick
  • Medicine
  • Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention
  • 2007
TLDR
Using sunscreens as an approach to skin cancer prevention for basal cell carcinoma or cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) at this point in time is unsupported because the epidemiologic evidence for the utility is flawed by poor reliability, potential negative confounding, inadequate latency between sunscreen use and development of basal cell cancer, and inaccurate measurement of sunscreen application. Expand
Sun exposure and melanoma risk at different latitudes: a pooled analysis of 5700 cases and 7216 controls
TLDR
Recreational sun exposure and sunburn are strong predictors of melanoma at all latitudes, whereas measures of occupational and total sun exposure appear to predict melanoma predominately at low latitudes. Expand
Site-specific protective effect of broad-spectrum sunscreen on nevus development among white schoolchildren in a randomized trial.
TLDR
Sunscreen use attenuated new nevus development on intermittently sun-exposed body sites for white schoolchildren, particularly among the freckled children. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...