Reduced growth but not survival of chicks with altered gape patterns: implications for the evolution of nestling similarity in a parasitic finch

@article{Schuetz2005ReducedGB,
  title={Reduced growth but not survival of chicks with altered gape patterns: implications for the evolution of nestling similarity in a parasitic finch},
  author={Justin G Schuetz},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2005},
  volume={70},
  pages={839-848}
}
  • Justin G Schuetz
  • Published 2005
  • Biology
  • Animal Behaviour
  • Pin-tailed whydahs, Vidua macroura, parasitize the parental care of common waxbills, Estrilda astrild, throughout southern Africa. Unlike most avian brood parasites, pin-tailed whydah nestlings resemble host young, precisely matching their elaborate gape patterns. Presumably, similarity arises through selection on parasites to avoid discrimination by host parents, but the mechanisms of this selection remain elusive. To investigate the capabilities of common waxbill parents to discriminate… CONTINUE READING
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