Reduced genetic variation and the success of an invasive species.

@article{Tsutsui2000ReducedGV,
  title={Reduced genetic variation and the success of an invasive species.},
  author={N. Tsutsui and A. Suarez and D. Holway and T. Case},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2000},
  volume={97 11},
  pages={
          5948-53
        }
}
  • N. Tsutsui, A. Suarez, +1 author T. Case
  • Published 2000
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Despite the severe ecological and economic damage caused by introduced species, factors that allow invaders to become successful often remain elusive. Of invasive taxa, ants are among the most widespread and harmful. Highly invasive ants are often unicolonial, forming supercolonies in which workers and queens mix freely among physically separate nests. By reducing costs associated with territoriality, unicolonial species can attain high worker densities, allowing them to achieve interspecific… Expand
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