Reduced corticotropin releasing factor binding sites in the frontal cortex of suicide victims.

@article{Nemeroff1988ReducedCR,
  title={Reduced corticotropin releasing factor binding sites in the frontal cortex of suicide victims.},
  author={Charles B. Nemeroff and Michael J. Owens and Garth Bissette and Anne C. Andorn and Michael Stanley},
  journal={Archives of general psychiatry},
  year={1988},
  volume={45 6},
  pages={
          577-9
        }
}
Previous studies have provided evidence that corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) is hypersecreted in patients with major depression. This CRF hypersecretion is believed to contribute at least in part to hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in depressed patients. If CRF is chronically hypersecreted in depressed patients, then, due to down-regulation, a reduced number of CRF receptor binding sites should be present in patients with profound depressive disorder. To test this… 
Corticotropin-releasing factor binding sites in cortex of depressed suicides
TLDR
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Corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactivity in post-mortem brain from depressed suicides
TLDR
Findings suggest that cortical CRF-I concentrations are unaltered in depressive illness and are discussed in relation to recent reports of elevated CRf-I con centrations in the cerebrospinal fluid of depressed patients.
Elevated Concentrations of CRF in the Locus Coeruleus of Depressed Subjects
TLDR
Increased concentrations of CRF-like immunoreactivity in micropunches of post-mortem LC from subjects with MDD symptoms as established by retrospective psychiatric diagnosis compared to nondepressed subjects matched for age and sex are described.
The role of Corticotropin Releasing Factor in Depressive Illness: a Critical Review
  • A. Mitchell
  • Psychology, Biology
    Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews
  • 1998
The role of corticotropin-releasing factor in depression and anxiety disorders.
TLDR
The hypothesis that CRF receptor antagonists may represent a novel class of antidepressants and/or anxiolytics, probably through its effects on central noradrenergic systems, is supported.
Increased corticotropin-releasing hormone immunoreactivity in monoamine-containing pontine nuclei of depressed suicide men
TLDR
Findings reveal that CRH-IR levels are specifically increased in norepinephrine- and serotonin-containing pontine nuclei of depressed suicide men, and thus they are consistent with the hypothesis thatCRH neurotransmission is elevated in extra-hypothalamic brain regions of depressed subjects.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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