Reduced Rates of Water Loss and Chemical Properties of Skin Secretions of the Frogs Litoria caerulea and Cyclorana australis

@article{Christian1997ReducedRO,
  title={Reduced Rates of Water Loss and Chemical Properties of Skin Secretions of the Frogs Litoria caerulea and Cyclorana australis},
  author={K. Christian and D. Parry},
  journal={Australian Journal of Zoology},
  year={1997},
  volume={45},
  pages={13-20}
}
We measured the rates of water loss in two Australian hylid frogs: the arboreal Litoria caerulea and the terrestrial burrowing frog Cyclorana australis. We measured the latter species with and without cocoons. Both species showed reduced rates of water loss compared with ‘typical’ amphibians that lose water as if from a free surface. Cocooned C. australis had very low rates of water loss. We examined the chemical composition of skin secretions rinsed (using only high-pure water) from both… Expand

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