Redox aspects of signaling by catecholamines and their metabolites.

@article{Smythies2000RedoxAO,
  title={Redox aspects of signaling by catecholamines and their metabolites.},
  author={John Smythies},
  journal={Antioxidants \& redox signaling},
  year={2000},
  volume={2 3},
  pages={
          575-83
        }
}
  • J. Smythies
  • Published 2000
  • Biology
  • Antioxidants & redox signaling
This review covers certain novel aspects of catecholamine signaling in neurons that involve redox systems and synaptic plasticity. The redox hypothesis suggests that one important factor in neurocomputation is the formation of new synapses and the removal of old ones (synaptic plasticity), which is modulated in part by the redox balance at the synapse between reactive oxygen species (ROS) (such as hydrogen peroxide and the nitric oxide radical) and neuroprotective antioxidants (such as… 
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