Red for “Stop”: “Traffic-Light” Nutrition Labels Decrease Unhealthy Food Choices by Increasing Activity and Connectivity in the Frontal Lobe

@article{Zhang2020RedF,
  title={Red for “Stop”: “Traffic-Light” Nutrition Labels Decrease Unhealthy Food Choices by Increasing Activity and Connectivity in the Frontal Lobe},
  author={Xuemeng Zhang and Y. Liu and Y. Gu and Shaorui Wang and H. Chen},
  journal={Nutrients},
  year={2020},
  volume={12}
}
Food labels comprise a national health-intervention policy that informs consumers of food-product nutritional value. Previous evidence has indicated that, compared to a purely numeric guideline-daily-amount label, a traffic-light-inspired, color-coded label more effectively conveys the nutritional level and increases the selection of healthier products. Therefore, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess the mechanism whereby traffic-light and guideline-daily-amount labels… Expand
2 Citations

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 51 REFERENCES
The impact of traffic light color-coding on food health perceptions and choice.
  • 15
  • PDF
‘Traffic-light’ nutrition labelling and ‘junk-food’ tax: a modelled comparison of cost-effectiveness for obesity prevention
  • 204
  • PDF
Salient nutrition labels increase the integration of health attributes in food decision-making
  • 34
  • PDF
Predictors of nutrition label viewing during food purchase decision making: an eye tracking investigation.
  • 74
  • PDF
Food labels promote healthy choices by a decision bias in the amygdala
  • 58
Neural correlates of the healthiness evaluation processes of food labels
  • 6
Impact of food labelling systems on food choices and eating behaviours: a systematic review and meta‐analysis of randomized studies
  • M. Cecchini, L. Warin
  • Medicine
  • Obesity reviews : an official journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity
  • 2016
  • 198
  • PDF
...
1
2
3
4
5
...