Red Yeast Rice for Dyslipidemia in Statin-Intolerant Patients

@article{Becker2009RedYR,
  title={Red Yeast Rice for Dyslipidemia in Statin-Intolerant Patients},
  author={David J. Becker and Ram Y. Gordon and Steven C. Halbert and Benjamin French and Patti B. Morris and Daniel J. Rader},
  journal={Annals of Internal Medicine},
  year={2009},
  volume={150},
  pages={830-839}
}
Context Statin-associated myalgias prevent some patients who would benefit from drug therapy for dyslipidemia from receiving it. Red yeast rice is a dietary supplement that can decrease low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level and could be a treatment option for patients with statin-associated myopathy. Contribution After 12 and 24 weeks, patients who received red yeast rice, 1800 mg twice daily, had significantly larger improvements in both LDL and total cholesterol levels than did… Expand
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