Red Imported Fire Ant Impacts on Upland Arthropods in Southern Mississippi

@inproceedings{Epperson2010RedIF,
  title={Red Imported Fire Ant Impacts on Upland Arthropods in Southern Mississippi},
  author={Deborah M. Epperson and C. R. Allen},
  year={2010}
}
Abstract Red imported fire ants (Solenopsis invicta) have negative impacts on a broad array of invertebrate species. We investigated the impacts of fire ants on the upland arthropod community on 20∼40 ha study sites in southern Mississippi. Study sites were sampled from 1997–2000 before, during, and after fire ant bait treatments to reduce fire ant populations. Fire ant abundance was assessed with bait transects on all sites, and fire ant population indices were estimated on a subset of study… Expand
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