Red‐back spider bites to Perth children, 1979‐1988

@article{Mead1993RedbackSB,
  title={Red‐back spider bites to Perth children, 1979‐1988},
  author={H. Mead and G. Jelinek},
  journal={Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health},
  year={1993},
  volume={29}
}
The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of illness caused by red‐back spider bites to children in Perth, Western Australia, over a 10 year period, and to compare it with that in adults. The case‐notes of 241 (89%) of the 271 children admitted to Princess Margaret Hospital and Fremantle Hospital with suspected red‐back spider bite from 1979 to 1988 were available for analysis. A definite bite was defined as a definite bite by a positively identified red‐back spider, positive… Expand
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