Recycling the Franks in Twelfth-Century England: Regino of Prüm, the Monks of Durham, and the Alexandrine Schism

@article{MacLean2012RecyclingTF,
  title={Recycling the Franks in Twelfth-Century England: Regino of Pr{\"u}m, the Monks of Durham, and the Alexandrine Schism},
  author={Simon MacLean},
  journal={Speculum},
  year={2012},
  volume={87},
  pages={649 - 681}
}
In the Middle Ages, even more so than today, history writing could be an act of political engagement. In an era without formal representation, the ability to persuade audiences of particular views of the past could be a significant weapon for those seeking to gain rhetorical leverage in political disputes. Yet “useful” history could be compiled from existing works as well as written from scratch. Because of the technologies of transmission in the age before printing, texts were essentially… 
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