Recursive syntactic pattern learning by songbirds

@article{Gentner2006RecursiveSP,
  title={Recursive syntactic pattern learning by songbirds},
  author={T. Gentner and K. Fenn and D. Margoliash and H. Nusbaum},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2006},
  volume={440},
  pages={1204-1207}
}
Humans regularly produce new utterances that are understood by other members of the same language community. Linguistic theories account for this ability through the use of syntactic rules (or generative grammars) that describe the acceptable structure of utterances. The recursive, hierarchical embedding of language units (for example, words or phrases within shorter sentences) that is part of the ability to construct new utterances minimally requires a ‘context-free’ grammar that is more… Expand
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