Recurrent patterns of natural selection in a population of Darwin's finches

@article{Price1984RecurrentPO,
  title={Recurrent patterns of natural selection in a population of Darwin's finches},
  author={Trevor D. Price and Peter R. Grant and H. Lisle Gibbs and Peter Boag},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1984},
  volume={309},
  pages={787-789}
}
The adaptive significance of morphological traits can be assessed by measuring and identifying the forces of selection acting on them. Boag and Grant1 documented directional selection in a small population of Darwin's medium ground finches, Geospiza fortis, on I. Daphne Major, Galápagos, in 1977. Large beak and body size were favoured at a time of diminishing food supply and high adult mortality. We show here that in two subsequent periods of moderate to high adult mortality (1980 and 1982… 

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...

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