Recruitment of individuals into the plankton: The importance of bioturbation1

@article{Marcus1986RecruitmentOI,
  title={Recruitment of individuals into the plankton: The importance of bioturbation1},
  author={Nancy H. Marcus and Jutta Schmidt-Gengenbach},
  journal={Limnology and Oceanography},
  year={1986},
  volume={31},
  pages={206-210}
}
The eggs of many planktonic copepods sink to the bottom in coastal waters and become buried beneath several centimeters of sediment where they cannot hatch. Bioturbation by three polychaetes, Nephtys incisa, Cistenides gouldii, and Clymenella torquata, promoted the burial of diapause eggs of the planktonic copepod Labidocera aestiva in a laboratory study. More important feeding by the two conveyor-belt-feeding species, C. gouldii and C. torquata, promoted the return of buried eggs to the water… 

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