Recovery of an injured corticospinal tract and an injured corticoreticular pathway in a patient with intracerebral hemorrhage.

@article{Yeo2013RecoveryOA,
  title={Recovery of an injured corticospinal tract and an injured corticoreticular pathway in a patient with intracerebral hemorrhage.},
  author={Sang Seok Yeo and Sung Ho Jang},
  journal={NeuroRehabilitation},
  year={2013},
  volume={32 2},
  pages={
          305-9
        }
}
The main function of the corticospinal tract (CST) is control of the distal musculature used for fine movements, in contrast, the corticoreticular pathway (CRP) innervates the proximal and axial musculature. We report on a patient with an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) who showed recovery of an injured CST and an injured CRP by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). The patient, a 38-year-old man, presented with severe paralysis of the right upper and lower extremities due to a spontaneous ICH in… Expand
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TLDR
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The results indicate that the putaminal hemorrhage frequently accompanies injury of both the CST and CRP, and the CRP appears to be more vulnerable to putaminals hemorrhage than the CST. Expand
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TLDR
Cognitive corticoreticular pathway injury is common in patients with motor weakness after subarachnoid haemorrhage, and it appears to be related to weakness in the contralateral shoulder, hip and lower extremity. Expand
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Functional Role of the Corticoreticular Pathway in Chronic Stroke Patients
TLDR
The increased fiber volume of the CRP in the unaffected hemisphere seems to be related to walking ability in patients with chronic stroke, and the compensation of theCRP inThe unaffected hemisphere seem to be one of the mechanisms for recovery of walking ability after stroke. Expand
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