Recovery from nonfluent aphasia after melodic intonation therapy

@article{Belin1996RecoveryFN,
  title={Recovery from nonfluent aphasia after melodic intonation therapy},
  author={Pascal Belin and Monica Zilbovicius and Philippe Remy and Cassim Francois and Sophie Guillaume and François Chain and G. Rancurel and Yves Samson},
  journal={Neurology},
  year={1996},
  volume={47},
  pages={1504 - 1511}
}
We examined mechanisms of recovery from aphasia in seven nonfluent aphasic patients, who were successfully treated with melodic intonation therapy (MIT) after a lengthy absence of spontaneous recovery.We measured changes in relative cerebral blood flow (CBF) with positron emission tomography (PET) during hearing and repetition of simple words, and during repetition of MIT-loaded words. Without MIT, language tasks abnormally activated right hemisphere regions, homotopic to those activated in the… 

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