Recovery from aphasia: Spontaneous speech versus language comprehension

@article{Prins1978RecoveryFA,
  title={Recovery from aphasia: Spontaneous speech versus language comprehension},
  author={Ronald S. Prins and Catherine E Snow and Erin Wagenaar},
  journal={Brain and Language},
  year={1978},
  volume={6},
  pages={192-211}
}
Abstract Seventy-four aphasic patients, subdivided into four groups (fluent, mixed, nonfluent, and severely nonfluent), were tested three times in the course of 1 year to assess recovery of spontaneous speech and sentence comprehension. Although 12 of the 28 spontaneous speech variables employed showed significant time changes, some of these changes indicated improvement and others deterioration. There was no overall clinical improvement in spontaneous speech in any group. On the sentence… Expand

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