Recording human electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals for neuroscientific research and real-time functional cortical mapping.

@article{Hill2012RecordingHE,
  title={Recording human electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals for neuroscientific research and real-time functional cortical mapping.},
  author={N. Jeremy Hill and Disha Gupta and Peter Brunner and Aysegul Gunduz and Matthew A. Adamo and Anthony L. Ritaccio and Gerwin Schalk},
  journal={Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE},
  year={2012},
  volume={64}
}
Neuroimaging studies of human cognitive, sensory, and motor processes are usually based on noninvasive techniques such as electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography or functional magnetic-resonance imaging. These techniques have either inherently low temporal or low spatial resolution, and suffer from low signal-to-noise ratio and/or poor high-frequency sensitivity. Thus, they are suboptimal for exploring the short-lived spatio-temporal dynamics of many of the underlying brain… CONTINUE READING