Reconstruction of the Sudden Oak Death epidemic in California through microsatellite analysis of the pathogen Phytophthora ramorum

@article{Mascheretti2008ReconstructionOT,
  title={Reconstruction of the Sudden Oak Death epidemic in California through microsatellite analysis of the pathogen Phytophthora ramorum},
  author={Silvia Mascheretti and Peter J. P. Croucher and Anna Maria Vettraino and Simone Prospero and Matteo Garbelotto},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2008},
  volume={17}
}
The genetic structure of the clonally reproducing Sudden Oak Death (SOD) pathogen in California was investigated using seven variable microsatellites. A total of 35 multilocus genotypes were identified among 292 samples representative of populations from 14 forest sites and of the nursery trade. amova indicated significant genetic variability both within (44.34%) and among populations (55.66%). Spatial autocorrelation analyses indicated that Moran's index of similarity reached a minimum of 0.1… 
Genetic epidemiology of the Sudden Oak Death pathogen Phytophthora ramorum in California
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Migration patterns of the emerging plant pathogen Phytophthora ramorum on the West Coast of the United States of America.
TLDR
The analyses of genetic diversity and inferences of reproductive mode confirm previous results for the Oregon and California populations, with the strong majority of the genotypes belonging to the NA1 clonal lineage and showing no evidence for sexual reproduction.
Population Genetic Analysis Infers Migration Pathways of Phytophthora ramorum in US Nurseries
TLDR
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TLDR
The authors' data are best explained by both introductions originating from nursery populations in California or Oregon and resulting from two distinct introduction events, which appear to correspond to a second introduction not clustering with the early introduction.
A microsatellite analysis identifies global pathways of movement of Phytophthora cinnamomi and the likely sources of wildland infestations in California and Mexico.
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Ancient isolation and independent evolution of the three clonal lineages of the exotic sudden oak death pathogen Phytophthora ramorum
TLDR
The divergence of the three clonal lineages of P. ramorum supports a scenario in which the three lineages originated from different geographic locations that were sufficiently isolated from each other to allow independent evolution prior to introduction to North America and Europe.
Changes in the population structure and sporulation behaviour of Phytophthora ramorum associated with the epidemic on Larix (larch) in Britain
TLDR
It is hypothesised that the growing dominance of EU1MLG1 has been an important driver in the emergence of the epidemic on larch, aided by its ability to sporulate more abundantly compared with the dominant unique British MLG.
Tracking populations of Phytophthora ramorum within trees and across the South-western Oregon tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus ) forest with DNA fingerprinting and the relative fitness of dominant and rare individuals. †
TLDR
This study examined the genetic diversity of 1589 samples collected from 2001 to 2008 and identified 60 novel multilocus genotypes (MGs) with one MG was dominant in all years representing 39 to 73% of isolates, supporting the hypothesis that it represents the founder genotype.
Intraspecific variation in host susceptibility and climatic factors mediate epidemics of sudden oak death in western US forests
TLDR
U. californica susceptibility has a large environmental component, yet still predicts potential disease severity in different sites especially where infestations are young or the pathogen has not yet arrived, and the accuracy and utility of predictive risk models for P. ramorum will be enhanced by the inclusion of both the environmental and host susceptibility components.
Intraspecific variation in host susceptibility and climatic factors mediate epidemics of sudden oak death in western US forests
Umbellularia californica is one of the key infectious hosts of the exotic Phytophthora ramorum , which causes sudden oak death (SOD) in California and Oregon forests. This study provides a
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TLDR
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