Reconstruction of major segmental loss of the proximal femur in revision total hip arthroplasty.

@article{Chandler1994ReconstructionOM,
  title={Reconstruction of major segmental loss of the proximal femur in revision total hip arthroplasty.},
  author={Hugh P. Chandler and J. Jackson Clark and Stephen B. Murphy and Jim McCarthy and Brad L. Penenberg and K. D. Danylchuk and Bernard Roehr},
  journal={Clinical orthopaedics and related research},
  year={1994},
  volume={298},
  pages={
          67-74
        }
}
Reconstruction of major proximal femoral segmental defects is one of the most difficult challenges in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). One technique that has been successful is the use of a modular, long-stemmed prosthesis, cemented to an allograft proximal femur and press-fit to the host bone. Since July 1989, the authors have used this technique in 30 hips (29 patients). The trochanteric slide approach was used in all cases. Sixty pounds of weight bearing was encouraged for six weeks… 

Structural proximal femoral allografts for failed total hip replacements

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Use of Femoral Allografts in Reconstruction of Major Segmental Defects

The patient with a femoral revision may live for many years and place high demands on the fixation of the femoral component, which may compromise proximal bone quality even further because of stress shielding.

Structural proximal femoral allografts for failed total hip replacements: a minimum review of five years.

The very good medium-term clinical results justify the continued use of structural allografts for failed total hip replacements with severe loss of proximal femoral bone.

Revision of the Deficient Proximal Femur With a Proximal Femoral Allograft

Proximal femoral allograft for revision hip arthroplasty in femoral segmental bone loss is a durable alternative in most patients for a complex problem.

Femoral bone loss in patients managed with revision hip replacement: results of circumferential allograft replacement.

The present study concentrates on the indications, biological mechanisms, techniques, and results associated with use of circumferential proximal femoral allografts in the revision of a failed total hip replacement.

The Use of Gamma-Irradiated Proximal Femoral Allografts for Bone Stock Reconstruction in Complex Revision Hip Arthroplasty

  • I. NusemD. Morgan
  • Medicine
    Hip international : the journal of clinical and experimental research on hip pathology and therapy
  • 2013
Good long-term results with the use of large anatomic-specific femoral allografts justify their continued use in cases of revision hip arthroplasty complicated with severe femoral bone loss.

Revision of failed total hip arthroplasty with a proximal femoral modular cemented stem.

We have designed a modular cemented femoral component for revision of failed total hip arthroplasty in which deficiency of the proximal femur is such as to require a variable extrafemoral portion of

Cementless revision total hip arthroplasty without allograft in severe proximal femoral defects.

Proximal femoral allograft-prosthesis composites in revision hip replacement: a 12-year follow-up study.

The use of an allograft prosthetic composite for reconstruction of the skeletal defect in complex revision total hip replacement for severe proximal femoral bone loss between 1986 and 1999 and survivorship was statistically significantly affected by the severity of the pre-operative bone loss.

Proximal Femoral Allografts for Reconstruction of Bone Stock in Revision Arthroplasty of the Hip: A Nine to Fifteen-Year Follow-up

The clinical and radiographic results at an average of eleven years after revision hip arthroplasty with a proximal femoral allograft are encouraging, and it is believed that this technique provides a viable option for treatment of the difficult problem of severe femoral bone loss.
...

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