Reconstruction of Y-chromosome phylogeny reveals two neolithic expansions of Tibeto-Burman populations

@article{Wang2018ReconstructionOY,
  title={Reconstruction of Y-chromosome phylogeny reveals two neolithic expansions of Tibeto-Burman populations},
  author={Lingxiang Wang and Yan Lu and Chao Zhang and Lan-Hai Wei and Shi Yan and Yun-Zhi Huang and Chuan-Chao Wang and Swapan Mallick and Shao-qing Wen and Li Jin and Shu-hua Xu and Hui Li},
  journal={Molecular Genetics and Genomics},
  year={2018},
  volume={293},
  pages={1293-1300}
}
Diffusion of Tibeto-Burman populations across the Tibetan Plateau led to the largest human community in a high-altitude environment and has long been a focus of research on high-altitude adaptation, archeology, genetics, and linguistics. However, much uncertainty remains regarding the origin, diversification, and expansion of Tibeto-Burman populations. In this study, we analyzed a 7.0M bp region of 285 Y-chromosome sequences, including 81 newly reported ones, from male samples from Tibeto… Expand
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