Reconstructing the Population History of European Romani from Genome-wide Data

@article{Mendizabal2012ReconstructingTP,
  title={Reconstructing the Population History of European Romani from Genome-wide Data},
  author={Isabel Mendizabal and Oscar Lao and Urko M Marigorta and Andreas Wollstein and Leonor Gusm{\~a}o and Vladim{\'i}r Fer{\'a}k and Mihai Ioana and Albena Jordanova and Radka Kaneva and Anastasia Kouvatsi and Vaidutis Kučinskas and Halyna Makukh and Andres Metspalu and Mihai G. Netea and Rosario de Pablo and Horolma Pamjav and Dragica Radojkovic and Sarah J.H. Rolleston and Jadranka Serti{\'c} and Milan Macek and David Comas and Manfred Kayser},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2012},
  volume={22},
  pages={2342-2349}
}
The Romani, the largest European minority group with approximately 11 million people, constitute a mosaic of languages, religions, and lifestyles while sharing a distinct social heritage. Linguistic and genetic studies have located the Romani origins in the Indian subcontinent. However, a genome-wide perspective on Romani origins and population substructure, as well as a detailed reconstruction of their demographic history, has yet to be provided. Our analyses based on genome-wide data from 13… Expand
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