Reconstructing the History of Marriage Strategies in Indo-European—Speaking Societies: Monogamy and Polygyny

@inproceedings{Fortunato2011ReconstructingTH,
  title={Reconstructing the History of Marriage Strategies in Indo-European—Speaking Societies: Monogamy and Polygyny},
  author={Laura Fortunato},
  booktitle={Human biology},
  year={2011}
}
  • L. Fortunato
  • Published in Human biology 31 March 2011
  • Sociology
Abstract Explanations for the emergence of monogamous marriage have focused on the cross-cultural distribution of marriage strategies, thus failing to account for their history. In this paper I reconstruct the pattern of change in marriage strategies in the history of societies speaking Indo-European languages, using cross-cultural data in the systematic and explicitly historical framework afforded by the phylogenetic comparative approach. The analysis provides evidence in support of Proto-Indo… 

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